Community Facilities at Cardiff Council

Community Facilities

Cardiff houses a variety of community facilities including Libraries, Community Centres and our Central Market. Cardiff Central Library is our largest Library and was specifically designed to be energy-efficient. It has a grass roof to improve insulation and reduce rainwater run-off, and coloured glass panels and solar shading to prevent excessive heat gains. Cardiff Market has been trading in one form or another since the 1700s, occupying the same site for over 100 years. Although you will no longer find livestock tethered and penned outside its doors, some of the old features remain.

Our energy use

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Study our data

Community Facilities shares its sustainability data so that everybody can help to identify new savings and suggest improvements. The icons below show the utility data currently available for each year.

If you have ideas on how Community Facilities could use energy more efficiently, please let us know!

2018

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2018 data

2017

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2017 data

2016

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2016 data

2015

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2015 data

2014

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2014 data

2013

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2013 data

2012

  • Oil

  • Heat

  • Water

  • Solar

  • Wind

  • Rain

Download 2012 data

Our sustainability targets

We have set ambitious targets for ourselves to cut our carbon emissions by 2018. We aim to reduce our carbon emissions from landfill, operational buildings, streetlighting and fleet operations by 60%. Here you can see our annual emissions, and our targets.

Notes about Community Facilities

Notes about Community Facilities

How do you calculate the CO2e emissions from a unit of energy used?

Energy retailers and the government produce conversion factors that describe the typical carbon impact of different energy sources. These allow us to take the energy uses (in their respective units), and calculate the approximate carbon dioxide emissions, normally measured in kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalents (kgCO2e). Defra's UK conversion factors may be found at Defra's 2018 Guidelines. .

What do the colours on the graph mean?

For buildings, the colours in the graph show approximately how the current level of usage would lead to a given Operational Rating – as set out on a Display Energy Certificate (DEC) – if the performance for a given moment carried on for an entire year. This goes from dark green for ‘A’ to red for ‘G’. We calibrate this using input data used for generating the building’s DEC, together with information relating to 'normal' buildings of its type. If we do not have data for all of the utilities noted in the DEC then the graph will appear in a light-blue colour scale, to indicate that the usage displayed on the graph is not representative of the full energy use of this building. Graphs for communities also show in this blue colour scale.

How do you get this data from the buildings?

Energy data is delivered to CarbonCulture's server every hour or so by Cardiff Council's own energy data system. This, in turn picks up energy data from the various meters located at Cardiff Council's buildings.

Why are you using these units and what do they mean?

We provide three different measures of the energy used: the amount of energy, its monetary cost, and the carbon impact of the energy used. Energy use is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh), which are the standard units of a home energy bill (1kWh is the amount of electricity used by ten 100W light bulbs in one hour). For electricity this number represents the amount of energy that flows into a building through the meter, and excludes distribution losses. For gas it is the amount of energy that is theoretically available by burning all the gas in an imaginary ideal burner. For district heating it reflects a flow of temperature into the building over time (after the heat produced by burning the fuel has been transported to the meter, which involves other losses). So each of these numbers, while all being measured in kWh, mean very different things. This is one reason that we prefer to use 'units per hour' when combining them. In some ways it would be more correct not to combine them at all, because combining them implies that the measures are comparable. This is a global challenge though, and conventions have become established around combining kWh. So we'll have to fix that another day. Monetary cost is calculated using the costs per 'unit' for each utility in every building. The figures used are noted below in the Notes section. The carbon impact is measured in kg of CO2e (the e stands for equivalent) which takes other climate-affecting gasses into account in addition to carbon dioxide.

Why isn't the graph updating?

Occasionally the data connection goes down and the graph isn't automatically updated with the current information. This is nothing to worry about. During these periods, all of the data is saved and we will fill in the graphs with the backdated information as soon as possible.